British slang dating dating someone diabetic

Beastly - You would call something or somebody beastly if they were really nasty orunpleasant.Most people would consider you a snob or an upper class git if you used this word. Bees Knees - This is the polite version of the dog's bollocks.Dodgy food should be thrown away at home, or sent back in a restaurant. Comes from the fact that a dog's bollocks are so fantastic that he can't stop licking them! A bit like some joint Anglo-American approaches to Eastern Europe for example! Either way it was horrendously embarrassing, especially as half the people on the tube had heard me!Donkey's years - Someone said to me the other day that they hadn't seen me for donkey's years. Drop a clanger - When I asked a large lady on the tube if she would like my seat since she was so obviously pregnant, she took the seat then told me she was fat, not pregnant! Duck - In and around Leeds you will find older people might call you "duck" in the same way that they might call you "love" or "dear" in other places.So if you are in polite company and want to say that something was fabulous, this phrase might come in handy. Bomb - If something costs a bomb it means that it is really expensive. Botch - There are two expressions here - to botch something up or to do a botch job. Budge up - If you want to sit down and someone is taking up too much space, you'd ask them to budge up - move and make some space.Belt up - For some reason I heard this quite a lot as a kid. Bender - I used to go out on a bender quite frequently when I was at university. Bite your arm off - This is not aggressive behaviour that a football fan might engage in. We say it when we see the price of insurance in the US, you could try saying it when you see how much jeans orpetrol cost over here! They both mean that the work done was not of a high standard or was a clumsy patch. Box your ears - Many young chaps heard their dads threaten to box their ears when I was a littlun. Bugger - This is another fairly unique word with no real American equivalent.

Bespoke - We say something is bespoke if it has been created especially for someone, in the same way that you say custom. Hence the reason Wendy's Hamburgers has never really taken off in England - who would buy "biggie fries"? For instance you might say that kids would bite your arm off for an ice cream on a sunny day. You may also hear someone shout "blast it", or even "bugger and blast"! It is added to the end of sentences a bit likeand that's it! Applies to building, DIY, programming and most other things. Technically speaking it meanstesticles but is typically used to describe something that is no good (that's bollocks) or that someone is talking rubbish (he's talking bollocks). Or you could say an event went down like a bomb and it would mean that the people really enjoyed it. Bottle - Something you have after twenty pints of lager and a curry. My father was always shouting "bugger" when he was working in the garage or garden. It might also be someone who is down and out, like a tramp.Generally you are considered to be a bit cheeky if you have an answer for everything and always have the last word. Or in the north "tara" which is pronounced sort of like "churar". If only they would stop fannying around and hurry up!My licence plate on my MX5 (Miata in American) was CHEEKY, which most Texans thought was something to do with bottoms - wrong!! Cheers - This word is obviously used when drinking with friends. For example when saying goodbye you could say "cheers", or "cheers then". Americans could use it in English pubs, but should avoid the other situations as it sounds wrong with an American accent. Cheesed off - This is a polite way of saying you are pissed off with something. Chuffed - You would be chuffed to bits if you were really pleased about something. - This expression brings back memories of being a kid and stealing apples from people's gardens. It means you are talking out of your butt and has nothing to do with any kind of dessert! Cockney rhyming slang - There are lots of words that make up cockney rhyming slang.It simply means counter-clockwise but must sound really strange to you chaps! Arse about face - This means you are doing something back to front. Usually in the advanced stages of drunken stupor, someone would be considered "completely arseholed". As well - You chaps say also when we would say "too" or "as well".Arse over elbow - This is another way of saying head over heels but is a little more descriptive. For instance if my friend ordered a Miller Lite, I would say "I'll have one as well".

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